WD45 rear tire size, and options
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    Junior Member CityBoy's Avatar
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    WD45 rear tire size, and options

    Good day esteemed vintage tractor folks. soon it may start to get warm around here and I am looking forward to fixing up my new baby. Google search of tire sizes reveals myriad opinions. I currently have 14.9 -28 on there and there seems to be consensus that this is the 'factory size' with even a few arguments about that. anyway i know those work because they are on there. I am hoping to find out what those numbers mean, and also find a list of others that 'can work.'
    currently there is a pair of 14.9 - 26 on our local craigslist for a hundred bucks and that seems to be pretty low for rear tractor tires. course i will probably get close and they will be all crackled up like old tractors always seem to be....but if i know a list of options i can keep an eye out
    thanks much
    mike in the snow in MN

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    A 14.9 -26 is two inches smaller in rim diameter and will never fit.

    The 14.9 refers to how tall your sidewalls are.
    The 28 is your rim size.

    The other factor is your rim width. If you have narrow rims your tire profile will be much taller. Wider rims would make the tire fatter with less sidewall.

    What I dont understand is. If you have good tires, why in the world are you looking at getting more tires?
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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    Super Moderator BigDaveinKY's Avatar
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    HOW TO READ YOUR TIRE SIZE… If your tire size has two sets of numbers (6-12, 5.00-15, 11.2-24…) the first number (5.00-15) is the approximate width in inches; the second number (5.00-15) is the rim diameter.
    If your tire size has three sets of numbers (15x6.00-6, 26x12.00-12, 31x15.50-15) the first number (26x12.00-12) is the approximate height, the second number (26x12.00-12) is the approximate width, and the third number (26x12.00-12) is the rim diameter.


    Now that being said, the rim will be different sizes to match the tire. If you have 14.9x28 tires on your tractor your rim should be 13" wide and 28" in diameter. A 16.9x28 tire would fit a 15" wide x 28" diameter rim. One can mount a size smaller or larger on a rim, but it may look skinny or balloonish. Best to keep with what is on the tractor now.
    No matter where you go.......There you are.

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    Hey Citiboy, I'm wishing those 14.9-26's were down here pretty close, cracked or not that is an increasingly difficult size to find in a reasonable price range. I have an Oliver 66 Orchard that needs that size in any usable condition. Unfortunatly for you, they will not fit your rims. Like Willy said, the 26 is the rim diameter. The 14.9 refers to the actual width of the tire. Normal sizes for width are 12.4, 13.6, 14.9 and 15.5 to name a few of the standards.

    There are a lot of 26" tires, but because those are popular diameters for combines and much larger widths are desired for the flotation effect in damp ground, most available are super wide. 23.1 and 24.5 are a couple standard widths for combine/flotation. Of course, this is way too much information for your actual question, so please disregard the lengthy reply.

    Btw, the WD 45 you will find to be a great workhorse. Good score sir.


    Whoa there, I see while I was typing my reply good old BigDave chimed in with the best and most pertinent information...So I apologize for the added confustion. But hey, that's how we roll sometimes huh.
    Last edited by missouri massey man; 03-13-2017 at 07:12 AM.

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    Senior Member 4imnotright's Avatar
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    Know several people that have used tires and rims off a Gleaner combine. Of course they won't be original.
    Steve
    1956 Massey Harris 333
    1948 Allis Chalmers C w/ wide front end

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    Junior Member CityBoy's Avatar
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    thanks for all the great input. W1lly, because i dont know how 'good' they actually are....they are basically holding air at this time but they are all crackled up and leaking salt water and corroding the rims, so i plan to take off the tires and drain the salt water to repair the rims, etc. granted that almost all the tires i see on vintage tractors seem to bee all cracked up, i wanted to just keep an eye out hoping to find something a little better to replace. maybe these cracked things last forever with a good tube, i dont know.
    appreciate the input, you guys rock!
    mike in MN

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    Junior Member CityBoy's Avatar
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    i appreciate the input and now have a pretty good idea of what those numbers mean, and what to watch for. i mainly keep an eye on the local craigs list although there is a vintage tractor boneyard in my area. i plan to drain out the saline water, maybe repair the rim and get new tubes...ive been told these big tires are easier to get off then small ones. so maybe ill do a repair and just 'throw on' a better set if i find them later. thats how us wannabe farmer city boys think. again....you guys rock!
    mike...in the land of pretty soon the maple sap is running

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    If you have saline filled tires the rims may need to be replaced. If you cant keep the tires from running flat then is the only time you will want to drain those tires. Make sure you have a garden hose washing fresh water where ever you drain the saline as the saline will kill the lawn if you "just" drain them. You will need some way to knock the bead off the rim as well. There after it is a matter of prying the rubber off. If you have never done it and dont have someone showing you how to remove a tire you nay get frustrated and find your needing to take the tires and rims to a shop. Nothing wrong with having a shop break down the tire for you. They may even show you how it is done for the next time you need to do it.
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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    Junior Member CityBoy's Avatar
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    thanks W1lly, i thought i would just drain the fluid on the driveway where i dont want weeds and grass anyway. Also I have 'spin out' rims....a feature touted in various places. i wonder if that means i can use various size tires. i have changed smaller tires so at least have experiencel.....im sure it may be a chore to break the bead on a larger one. im a pretty determined (stubborn) cityboy, will probably find a way

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    Spin out rims are good for changing the width of the tractor for the width of your crops.

    It is human nature to feel the need to change out perfectly good items to make something your own. Yet why are you in the need to change expensive tires? The problem with buying tires that you dont need? No one else needs them either. So buying tires to replace perfectly good treads is pointless and a waste of money. Your not improving the tractor by doing so.

    On the flip side....
    Smaller tires will only slightly increase your torque, yet reduce your travel speed.
    Bigger tires will take horse power and make the tractor feel sluggish. Yet if you do have enough horsepower you might go a mile an hour faster.
    Messing with your tires for customization may end up making your tractor less enjoyable and you finding out you need to put the old tires back on and be stuck with tires that wont sell. But hey, it is your money.

    If you feel you have money, go buy some implements.
    Last edited by Wi11y; 03-23-2017 at 10:41 PM.
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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