Tine Bar Bearings on New Holland Hayrakes
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  1. #1
    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    Tine Bar Bearings on New Holland Hayrakes

    Have any of yall had to replace them? I changed some many years ago and they are tough when it comes to putting the bar back on the rake. I was hoping there is a secret that I have not found. My next step is to search the net.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Senior Member Destroked 450's Avatar
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    If you find that easy way to install the bar bearings, please list it so the rest of us can know.
    62 Ford 881D
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    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    What I have found so far is that the retaining ring holding a bearing in place popped off allowing the bearing to come loose from the bar. The interior of the bar housing has worn and the bearing, which is good, was loose. I am attempting a farm inspired fix and will let you know how it goes.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    Is it something that could take a shim? Or perhaps a thin wall tubing so the bearing fits tightly?
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    Exactly what I am trying.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    One bearing was bad and the other end was worn with the bearing good. I used a piece of steel strapping to shim the worn end. I replaced the bearing and the snap ring groove was also worn, and the ring was hard to seat.

    On top of the snap ring I placed a washer that fit inside the housing, and over it I placed a larger washer and tack-welded it in place. I drilled the back side of both housings and added grease fittings. The hole also made it easy to punch out the worn bearing.

    To get it back together I loosened all the bearings on the end I was working on and began to loosen the ones on the opposite end. After loosening 3 on the opposite end Miss Joanne helped me rotate the star wheels to get the other 2 bar ends towards the top. I just happened to look at the loose bearing and noticed that it was almost lined up with its mounting hole in the star wheel. It went together pretty easy without too much trouble. I raked about 6 acres with it yesterday and it stayed together. I guess the rotation plus the slack from loosening the other bar ends together made the difference.
    Last edited by Jim in NC; 05-20-2017 at 09:28 AM.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    Glad you got it working. Now hopefully it stays together for another 50 years.
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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    Moderator prwttsh's Avatar
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    Farmer ingenuity at work. Sounds like it should work.
    Rain makes grain

    Bruce

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    Jim in NC (05-21-2017)

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    Senior Member Destroked 450's Avatar
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    You should be ok if the dust shield still fits up close, I completely rebearinged my 256 rake a few years ago, I also drilled the bar ends for grease fittings, one of the dust shields was in questionable condition and the dealer didn't have one so I reused it.
    Grass got in between the dust shield and bearing causing the bearing to fail before the end of hay season, the dust shield fitting up close the the bar end is very important.
    Other wise it looks like you did a nice job repairing and saving that bar. I priced a new bar a few years ago, didn't buy it, I'm thinking it was over $250 for one bar.
    62 Ford 881D
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    Back in the 70s I worked for a small pea cannery, we had three Hesston swathers. To change those rapidly, we drilled a hole with a holesaw, in a fairly straight area of the guide rail, and reinforced the flange with flat bar. Worked great.

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