Tractors That Are to Climb on or Off
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  1. #1
    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    Tractors That Are to Climb on or Off

    Just got to thinking about how hard it is to step up on some tractors. Some are much easier than others depending upon height, steps, both factory and farmer-made, and running boards. My hardest tractor to climb on is my Allis C. Despite my step there is really no good flat place to put the second foot. The rounded tranny housing and other places can be slippery. My second hardest is my JD 40S. I find myself trying to be extra careful when entering and exiting these.
    What are the ones yall think are hard to climb on or off?
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Senior Member Destroked 450's Avatar
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    When I was young we had a WD Allis for a little while, there always seamed to be a little oil on the drawbar from a pto or belt drive seal but not enough to warrant replacing the seal, you had to be careful when you stepped on that drawbar to climb up on the tractor.
    When the drawbar was off and the cultivators where on I had to climb the cultivator shanks to get on, after dad skinned his shin a few time slipping off that drawbar he traded it for a Fordson Dexta which was our first diesel tractor.
    62 Ford 881D
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    Senior Member JD2840's Avatar
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    B/C allis chalmers for sure, F20s, especially with a mounted planter and well my 986 is pretty awkward to get into
    Ray~ The Texas Keykeeper.
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    Super Moderator BigDaveinKY's Avatar
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    Dad's old '39 John Deere Model B that he would never take the cultivators off. That's when I had both good legs.
    I wouldn't even try an offset IH model lessen it had a good wide helper step. I've got to have a good spot to stop with both feet on the way up or down.
    No matter where you go.......There you are.

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    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    The 40S with the cultivators are worse than without them. The lifting rods for the front cultivators are right next to the seat and the operator is almost enclosed in a cage. The later models had the rods run under the rear axle which made it some better.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    This Oliver is a real callenge to get onto.
    -First step with your left foot onto the step.
    -right leg has to go otherside of the fender and step onto the frame member for the loader to the rear axle.
    -left footcomes up onto the frame nearest the vertical
    -right foot then can be lifted over the transmission and into the foot plate area on the right side.
    -you can now move the left foot into the left side of the tractor and sit down.

    It took me quite a while to figure out that dance. Once learned I no longer break into a sweat to get onto it.

    To get off of the tractor is almost the same but.
    -Try and get vertical to a painful position with steering wheel.
    -move right foot onto frame outside of right foot well and transfer weight.
    -now do the sumo wrestler stomp and get left foot on frame rail outside of left foot well.
    -you can now rotate your bod to get the right foot onto the frame at the rear axle. Mind you they relocated the gear shift so when you put your foot back down, your pants leg might get caught on the gear shift. Then you do a weird little dance while not falling over of getting your pants leg off the gearshift.


    Oh and 2 prior owners ago put the 18 inch steering wheel on (normally a 15 inch) making it so the operator can only be sitting down. Cant stand up unless you like your legs impaled with the rim of the steering wheel.
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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    Senior Member Wi11y's Avatar
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    I must take a closer pic of the operator area with the loader frame that creates such a challenge.
    Tho if this dance was typical of Olivers with loaders? I can see why many farmers no longer gave Oliver a second look when buying a new tractor.

    Yet I must admit, the gear shift pattern is very comfortable when running the loader. A nice relaxed position. Changing directions is a breeze. Then to go to high range. Only thing that would make life easier would have been a shuttle shift.
    Last edited by Wi11y; 06-20-2017 at 08:00 AM. Reason: added a picture
    If it isnt broken, dont repair it.

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    Senior Member Sugarmaker's Avatar
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    The toughest one that i have right now is the IH TD6 loader. You have to climb up over the tracks across the frame work and step down into the cockpit like getting in a jet fighter (I think). Room is limited in the cockpit. and getting out is just as much of a challenge.
    On conventional tractors: the D17 dance is a challenge. I did add a step, as the normal platform height is 26 inches from the ground! I have learned to move the seat rearward to enter and exit the 17, that makes it easier.
    The Jubilee is probably the easiest to get on an off. Ford got that about right!
    The WD's are not to hard to get on, but leg room and positioning can be a issue.
    Regards,
    Chris
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    Moderator wizzard's Avatar
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    I'll vote for the allis c also. somebody dropped the ball in the engineering department for shure on those. we built a "normal" set for ours so you could climb on from the back witch made it a lot easyer
    Bert.

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    Moderator Jim in NC's Avatar
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    I added a step on the left side of the C to help but getting further up into the sitting position is still hard for me.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you're a thousand miles from a cornfield." ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower

    "Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads." Henry David Thoreau

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    Wi11y (06-26-2017)

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